The forgotten practice of women's circles

Jun 25, 2018

Did you know that in ancient times, it was common for women to sit in circle in their communities?

Wisdom and stories were passed down through the generations and rites of passage were an integral part of transitions through life.

Sadly, the modern world has mostly forgotten or abandoned these practices.

As wāhine Māori living in the western world, we have shifted from our natural rhythms and cycles to the striving and hustling required in a patriarchal world - much to our detriment.

But it's not all bad news.

Recent times have seen many women craving a circle, a sisterhood, a place to belong, to be seen, heard and held and it seems that women's circles are now on the rise.

The upsurge of women’s circle gatherings is no coincidence.

More and more women are tuning into themselves, realising that they want something ‘more’.

Connecting in circle is a powerful way for women to not only empower and heal themselves but also enables them to create genuine connections and friendships.

No longer do women wish to be compartmentalised, categorised or continue to accept the status quo.

The glass ceiling is breaking and women everywhere are awakening.

Modern technology and platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter and email lists have made it easier to create online circles or groups.

When I started iWahine NZ I wanted to reach beyond physical and geographical boundaries.

I wanted to reach out to wāhine who were physically, emotionally or spiritually isolated and distanced.

I wanted to reach out to women who were seeking connection, support, and inspiration.

Te Hao is my inner sacred circle.

It closes on 30 June 2018.

Awhimai

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